Wednesday, September 20, 2006

 

Olbermann

Keith Olbermann speaks truth to power.

In four simple words last Friday, the President brought into sharp focus what has been only vaguely clear these past five-and-a-half years - the way the terrain at night is perceptible only during an angry flash of lightning, and then, a second later, all again is dark. "It's unacceptable to think," he said. It is never unacceptable to think. And when a President says thinking is unacceptable, even on one topic, even in the heat of the moment, even in the turning of a phrase extracted from its context, he takes us toward a new and fearful path - one heretofore the realm of science fiction authors and apocalyptic visionaries. That flash of lightning freezes at the distant horizon, and we can just make out a world in which authority can actually suggest it has become unacceptable to think. Thus the lightning flash reveals not merely a President we have already seen, the one who believes he has a monopoly on current truth. It now shows us a President who has decided that of all our commanders-in-chief, ever, he alone has had the knowledge necessary to alter and re-shape our inalienable rights. This is a frightening, and a dangerous, delusion, Mr. President. [...] "Governments are instituted among men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed. That whenever any form of government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the right of the people to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new government." Those incendiary thoughts came, of course, from a prior holder of your job, Mr. Bush. They were the words of Thomas Jefferson. He put them in the Declaration of Independence. Mr. Bush, what would you say to something that anti-thetical to the status quo just now? Would you call it "unacceptable" for Jefferson to think such things, or to write them? Between your confidence in your infallibility, sir, and your demonizing of dissent, and now these rages better suited to a thwarted three-year old, you have left the unnerving sense of a White House coming unglued - a chilling suspicion that perhaps we have not seen the peak of the anger; that we can no longer forecast what next will be said to, or about, anyone who disagrees. [...] Apologize, sir, for even hinting at an America where a few have that privilege to think and the rest of us get yelled at by the President. Anything else, Mr. Bush, is truly unacceptable.

Comments:
Yeah. You know, you're right. The actions of the USA are comparable to Islamic extremists! I'd never thought about it that way before. Truth to power, indeed.

The new campaign slogan that will sweep conservatives out of office isn't catchy, but hey, when was the truth ever simple:

Stop Islamo-USA terror!
 
Bush told us "they" hate us for our freedoms. Who knew to keep us "safe" he'd capitulate to the terrorists and give up our freedoms.

The Geneva Conventions? How quaint. The Rule of Law? Who needs it?

The Republican'ts are doing such a fabulous job we need to "stay the course".

Corruption, lying, fear mongering, shutting down dissent and debate, war profiteering. These are the things that made America great, right Spectator.
 
If we think, the Islamofascists will have won.
 
I am very glad you chose to help spread Keith Olbermann's special comment on your blog. You Tube has all the videos, as does keitholbermann.org -- perhaps you would like to actually add the video to the blog?
 
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